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Dry Plate Making 

FOR 

Amateurs. 



A SERIES OF ARTICLES FIRST PUBLISHED IN THE 
PHOTOGRAPHIC TIMES. 

' BY 

GEORGE L. SINCLAIR, M.D. 



( With Additions and Corrections^) 



New York : 
SCOVILL MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 
W. IRVING ADAMS, Agent. 

1 8 8 6. 



TR 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Publishers' Notice 5 

Introduction 7 

The Emulsion 9 

Washing 14 

Melting 16 

A Rapid Emulsion 17 

Gelatine 20 

Preparing the Glass for Coating 22 

Coating 24 

Conclusion..., , 28 



PUBLISHERS' NOTICE. 



The following practical instructions for dry plate making 
were written by Dr. Geo, L. Sinclair, an amateur photographer, 
with no thought that they would ever be published in a form 
more pretentious than as contributed articles to the photo- 
graphic journal in which they first appeared ; but the articles 
attracted to themselves more attention than the modest author 
would have predicted, and were read not only by the numer- 
ous readers of The Photographic Times, but by so many 
others, that our limited supply of the extra copies containing 
the articles being soon exhausted, we decided to republish them 
in pamphlet form. 

The articles have been arranged in their present form by 
the editor of The Photographic Times with the suggestions 
and approval of the author. 

They were originally written by Dr. Sinclair, in leisure 
moments, after professional labors, as the fruit of experiments 
which he had also made in otherwise unemployed hours. It 
does not pretend to be a scientific treatise, or anything more 
than a simple narration of experience ; but as the outcome of 
practical experiment, the information given can be relied upon 
as trustworthy. 

We, therefore, present this little book to the photographic 
fraternity with these few preliminary remarks, confident that 
it will fill a want in photographic literature. 




INTRODUCTION. 



In his work, " Modern Photography," Mr. W. K. Burton 
says : The amateur will generally find it best to purchase his 
plates from a manufacturer. He will probably find it cheaper 
and more satisfactory to do so than to manufacture them him- 
self, unless he has at his disposal considerable time and has 
great patience and a happy temperament which will enable 
him to bear frequent disappointment, when, after going 
through the tedious process of making an emulsion and coat- 
ing his plates, he finds that the latter are, through some un- 
known cause, useless. 

With much of the above quotation I agree, but I have no 
hesitation in saying that the failures are much fewer than the 
successes, and the process of making an emulsion is not by any 
means the least interesting in connection with photography. 

For the benefit of my brother amateurs who may feel in- 
clined to try their skill in this department, I shall record my 
experiences, giving them the results of any knowledge I may 
have gained through my own failures. 

G. L. S. 



VV 



Dry Plate Making for Amateurs. 



Published in the Photographic Times, Vol. XVI. 
(Nos. 239 to 243, inclusive). 



THE EMULSION. , 

The formulas for emulsions are numerous. I shall quote 
only two. 

The first is for a slow emulsion of excellent quality, and is 
practically the one recommended by Mr. Debenham in his 
article in the Photographic News. The second I obtained 
from Wilson's "Mosaics" for 1885. It is rapid, and gives 
negatives which leave little to be desired so far as printing 
qualities are concerned. 

If I appear too rudimentary it is because some of my 
readers may be novices in the work of emulsion making. 

I am fortunate in having a bath-room provided with a basin 
as well as a tub, and a plentiful supply of both cold and hot 
water. It opens into a room which is unused in the evening. 

I do my emulsion making at night; but some of the opera- 
tions connected with it — for example, the washing — are oc- 
casionally performed by day, so I have made the door of the 
bath-room light tight. 

My non-actinic illumination is by means of a ruby lantern. 
The apparatus required is of a very simple and primitive kind 



io 



DRY PLATE MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 



and consists, in addition to the graduates and scales — which 1 
presume all amateurs have — of a tin kettle holding about two 
quarts (mine is narrower at the top than at the bottom, and 
has a spout closed by a tin flap), with a tight fitting cover. I 
have an ordinary retort stand, an alcohol lamp with a large 
wick, one or two common tumblers, and several perfectly 
clean yellow glass pyro bottles, and, lastly, one or two stirring 
rods of glass, 

I may say that I have not been successful in the " cold 
emulsion process," and, for certainty, prefer either the " boil- 
ing " method or some modification of it. 

I advise the beginner to try first the emulsion by the Deb- 
enham formula. 

It is simply made, requires very little silver, no boiling, and 
possesses every good quality, except rapidity. For landscapes 
this is not very necessary. It is also cheap, and if one spoils 
a batch of plates the pecuniary loss is not great. The chemi- 
cals used should be pure, and the gelatines " photographic." 
The common cooking gelatine will not answer, or, at best, 
will give plates which are very defective. 

To make an emulsion by this formula proceed as follows : 
Take of 

Nelson's No. 1 gelatine 20 grains 

Bromide of potassium 15 grains 

Distilled water % ounce 

Put the gelatine in a glass and cover it with the water; 
allow it to soak for ten minutes, then add the bromide of po- 
tassium and stir till it is dissolved. Place the glass containing 
the bromized gelatine in a basin or dish capable of holding 
three quarts or a gallon of water, and pour into the basin water 
at a temperature of about 120 deg. F. If you have a bath- 
room with a fixed basin and hot and cold water, you can get 



THE EMULSION. 



11 



along very nicely. Fit a cork to the outlet of the basin in- 
stead of an ordinary plug ; through the cork pass a piece of 
brass tube about half an inch in diameter and four inches Ions:. 
This gives you an overflow to your basin, and by pulling it up 
or down through the cork you can regulate the height to which 
you wish the water to rise. Having by some means surround- 
ed your cup or glass containing the bromide, water and gela- 
tine with warm water, allow it to remain until the gelatine is 
dissolved. This will not take many minutes. "While this is 
going on, prepare, in a second glass (I use an ordinary 2 oz. 
graduate, as it has a spout for pouring), a solution of 

Nitrate of silver (recrystallized) 20 grains. 

Distilled water 1 ounce. 

Dissolve by stirring with the glass rod ; when solution is 
complete, put this glass also in the basin and raise the tem- 
perature to that of the bromized gelatine. When this is done, 
in a dark room by ruby light, pour, in five or six doses, the 
silver solution into the gelatine solution, stirring with a glass rod 
all the time. A change in the color is at once visible, caused by 
the formation of the yellow bromide of silver. When you 
have thoroughly mixed the two solutions — and this must be 
done in the smallest quantity of non-actinic light by which 
you can see — pour them into one of the pyro bottles, or into a 
stoneware opaque bottle of suitable size, and put the bottle or 
jug into water at a temperature of from 130 deg. to 160 deg. 
F, In my case I do this by merely turning on the hot water 
tap of my basin. I test the water with the thermometer and 
do not let it go higher than 160 deg. F. If possible, I keep 
it at this temperature for from two to three hours. With this 
formula you can let the heat vary from 120 deg. to 180 deg. F., 
without fear of injury. To keep it between these two ex- 



i2 DRY PLATE MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 

tremes is not very difficult. If you have not fixed hot water 
apparatus, you can put your bottle or jar in the tin kettle 
which you have filled with hot water, and covered with the lid 
on the retort stand, then put your alcohol lamp under it and 
raise the temperature to the required degree. Or you (if you 
are using an opaque bottle for mixing your emulsion, such as a 
clean gingerbeer or ink jug) may put the kettle containing it 
upon the kitchen stove, and accomplish the same end. 

It is well to have two stoppers for the bottle, one to fit tight 
and the other with grooves cut in the sides to allow the escape 
of steam from the emulsion. 

In whatever way you select to get the emulsion raised to 
the desired temperature (120 deg. to v 160 deg. F.), you must re- 
member that it is to be kept at that heat until the blue stage 
is reached. 

The "blue" stage is the sensitive stage, and is obtained in 
various ways in different formulas. 

If, immediately after mixing your silver solution with your 
bromized gelatine, you take a drop of the emulsion, place it 
upon a piece of glass and look at a lamp light or gas light 
through it, you will see that the color is a red-orange. After 
being subjected to boiling, or to heat for a varying length of 
time, the color changes gradually until it becomes blue ; when 
this is obtained the emulsion is done. In my experience with 
formula given, if I keep the bottle in water which is not 
below 130 deg. F. and not above 170 deg F., the blue color 
will appear in about two and a half hours. 

It is well to remove the bottle from the hot water every half 
hour, take out the grooved cork, insert the tight fitting one, 
and shake the emulsion thoroughly for a few minutes. This 
seems to insure a finer subdivision of the particles and a better 
emulsion. 



THE EMULSION. 



13 



Half an hour before the cooking is finished you weigh out 

Hard gelatine 70 grains. 

Nelson's No. 1 gelatine 70 grains. 

Put this in a cup or wide mouth bottle capable of holding 
eight ounces ; pour upon it three ounces of cold water and 
allow it to soak. In half an hour the probability is that the 
water will nearly all be absorbed by the gelatine which will 
be considerably increased in bulk. 

If your emulsion has by this time reached the blue stage, 
allow the water by which it is surrounded to cool down to 100 
deg. F., and while this is taking place put the vessel contain- 
ing the swelled gelatine in water at the same temperature (100 
deg. F.), and allow the gelatine to slowly melt. When this is 
accomplished and the emulsion has cooled down to 100 deg, F., 
pour it upon the softened gelatine, stirring thoroughly, and 
then put the vessel in a dark, cool place and leave it until the 
contents have become cold, when it will have acquired the 
consistency of tough jelly. In other words the emulsion has 
"set." 

This is a good point at which to stop. It becomes tedious 
to attempt the making and subsequent operations of washing, 
remelting and filtering the same night. 

When Mr. Debenham published the formula, from which 
the above description is a departure in some particulars, he said 
the emulsion could be used without washing. So it can ; but 
there is crystallization of some of the salts upon the glass, the 
drying is irregular and the emulsion is not at its best. Far 
better it is to wash it in the way I shall now describe. 



WASHING. 



The lump of emulsion which is the result of setting, con- 
tains not only the sensitive and insoluble bromide of silver, 
but also the insensitive and soluble nitrate and bromides. 
These must be removed. It can be done by washing. 

Gelatine holds these soluble salts very tightly in its grasp, 
and to remove them thoroughly it is necessary to ' break the 
jelly up into small pieces so that the water may penetrate them 
and dissolve the salts. 

There are several ways of subdividing the gelatine, but the 
simplest and best is to squeeze the jelly through the meshes 
of embroidery canvas. Procure a piece of canvas known as 
"railway canvas," about eighteen inches square. You can 
buy it at a shop dealing in worsteds, etc. You must first 
thoroughly soak it in boiling water to remove the size and 
starch ; then dry it again. I have two common water jugs 
with mouths wide enough to admit my two hands. They hold 
a gallon of water each. I have also a hair sieve seven inches 
in diameter, the use of which I shall explain further on. 

When you are ready to wash the emulsion, you again go to 
the dark room, light your ruby lamp, and with a silver or horn 
spoon remove the jelly from the vessel in which it has been 
allowed to set or stiffen. Place it in the center of the square 
of canvas, gather the canvas up by the four corners, then 
holding the neck with the left hand, grasp the lump of emul- 
sion with the right, plunge both hands into the jug containing 
water at a temperature of about 40 deg. F,, and twist the can- 
vas till the jelly is forced through the meshes into the water. 



WASHING. 



15 



It will then be broken*into small shreds, which will speedily 
settle to the bottom of the jug. This material is now to be 
washed. 

I find that by allowing it to settle, then stirring it about with 
a clean hand, again permitting it to settle, then pouring off 
the clear water and pouring on fresh, and continuing this for 
twenty minutes and then pouring the whole into the hair sieve 
and doucing this with several jugf ulls of cold water, the wash- 
ing is complete. To make the washing more thorough you 
may again collect the shreds and squeeze them a second time 
through the canvas. I think it would be safer to do this, 
though such has not always been my practice. 

Let the broken-up mass remain in the hair sieve; which can 
stand on its edge in a basin to allow draining to take place. In 
an hour the water will have so far passed through the sieve 
that the consistency of the emulsion is about that of butter. 
It must now be melted and strained to remove any mechanical 
impurities. 



MELTING. 



To melt it, you remove it from the sieve with a horn or sil- 
ver spoon and put it into a cup or jar (I use a gallipot with a 
cover) which is placed in water at about 100 deg. or 120 
deg. Fahrenheit. When it is about the consistency of 
thick milk it is ready for straining. To accomplish this I 
have an ordinary lamp chimney of the pattern in which 
the upper edge is turned partly over and fluted or 
scalloped. Over this end I fasten two thicknesses of an old 
handkerchief, and having previously wanned the extemporized 
filter, pour the melted emulsion into it. It runs through the 
handkerchief readily, and if it shows any tendency to stop run- 
ning, by placing the mouth over the open end of the chimney 
and blowing with some force, you can drive it with greater 
rapidity. When all has passed through, into a convenient ves- 
sel (I use a pyro bottle for this) you should have about six or 
seven ounces of emulsion. If less, make it up to that quantity 
by the addition of warm water. 

Finally, add one-half ounce of warm alcohol and your emul- 
sion is ready to be poured on the plate. 

You may, if you please, again put the vessel aside in a dark 
cool place to wait until you can proceed to the coating of your 
plates. If you do not intend using it for some days, it will be 
well to add some antiseptic. Thymol is very good, and two 
grains dissolved in the alcohol above mentioned will keep the 
emulsion from spoiling for a long time. 

I have gone somewhat fully into the modus operandi, be- 
cause it is the same, so far as washing, melting, filtering, etc., 
is concerned in all formulas. 



A RAPID EMULSION. 



The emulsion, the making of which I have attempted to 
describe, as I said, is slow. 

For a more rapid, and in every way an excellent one, I give, 
from "Mosaics," the following modified recipe and description : 

Nelson's No. 1 gelatine 80 grains 

Bromide of potassium (Schering's) 164 grains 

Iodide of potassium " 20 grains 

Water (filtered) 5 ounces. 

First dissolve the salts and then add the gelatine, and set the 
vessel containing the solution in hot water (temperature, 120 
deg.F.). 

Weigh out 232 grains nitrate of silver (recrystallized), put 
in a bottle ; a pyro bottle or an opaque jug. Now heat both 
the vessel containing the bromized gelatine and the bottle 
containing the nitrate of silver to a temperature of about 140 
deg. F., by any convenient means ; carry them into your dark 
room, in which your kettle or saucepan or vessel in which you 
propose to boil your emulsion, has been filled with water at a 
boiling temperature, and in a weak ruby light pour in a stream 
the bromized gelatine upon the dry, hot crystals of nitrate of 
silver. Insert the tight-fitting stopper and shake vigorously 
till the silver crystals are dissolved. You can generally tell 
this by the sound of their striking the bottle ceasing. 

Then place the emulsion in the kettle of boiling water ; having 
previously removed the tight cork and inserted the grooved 
one. Cover the kettle tightly, place your alcohol lamp under it 
and let the water and the emulsion boil briskly for half an hour. 
If boiled longer than this add one or two drops of nitric acid. 



18 



DRY PLATE MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 



To insure the contents of the bottle or jar being at the same 
temperature as the water, in which it is suspended, it is necessary 
to completely surround it. I do this by swinging the bottle in 
the water, so that it does not touch the kettle at either bottom 
or sides. I take a piece of brass wire, about JSfo. 12, and encircle 
the neck of the bottle ; by a twist this is secured. The free 
ends I bend like a hook, which I hang upon the side of the 
kettle. This vessel being narrower at the top than the bottom, 
the bottle falls away from its side and remains suspended in 
the boiling water. The small size of the wire used does not 
prevent your fitting the cover over the kettle securely. 

The flame of an alcohol lamp can, I believe, be made non- 
actinic by adding a little common salt to the alcohol itself. 
Every ten minutes I remove the lamp from the room, uncover 
the kettle, take out the bottle of emulsion and again putting in 
the tight stopper, shake the bottle for a few seconds, then re- 
place it again in the kettle, cover it, and bring the alcohol lamp 
back to the dark room, put it under the kettle and again boil 
the water. 

I have never had fog in this emulsion, and I have made 
several batches just as I have endeavored to describe above. 

As soon as you have mixed your emulsion and started the 
cooking, you again return to your outside room and weigh out 

Hard gelatine - .180 grains 

Soft gelatine 100 grains, 

Put this in a cup and pour on a sufficient quantity of cold 
water to cover it. Let it soak during the boiling of the emul- 
sion, say for half an hour. At the expiration of that time, re- 
move your alcohol lamp, and leaving your bottle of emulsion 
in the kettle let its contents gradually cool. 

While this is going on place the cup containing the softened 
gelatine in water at about 100 deg. F., and allow it to melt. 



A BAPID EMULSION". 



19 



By the time this is complete the temperature of the emuL 
sion will have probably reached the same figure ; when it has, 
pour it upon the softened melted gelatine, and stir thoroughly, 
till perfectly mixed, with a silver fork or spoon. Finally add 
to this, with much stirring, one dram of strong water of 
ammonia, and shake well. Then remove the emulsion to a 
cool, dark place and allow it to set. Again, it is well to break 
off operations here. 



GELATINE. 



In both the latter and Debenham's formula, I used a mixture 
of hard and soft gelatine in that portion which is added after 
the cooking. 

If you use only hard, as the original recipes suggest, you get 
a plate with a hard glossy film which is not so easily penetrated 
by the developer. 

To the use of this mixed gelatine, and also to the necessity 
of abiding the emulsion to the uncooked gelatine at a tempera- 
ture of about 95 deg. F., I believe is due the " mat " surface 
which is thought best in a dry plate. 

The author of this recipe claims that it owes its excellence 
and rapidity to the fact* that he adds his bromized gelatine at 
a temperature of 140 deg. F., to dry silver crystals of the same 
degree of heat. At any rate, it is ail excellent emulsion. 
Plates coated with it will be quick enough for drop shutter 
views. 

I do not recommend the same method of mixing in Deb- 
enham's formula. I have failed in that emulsion to obtain any 
increase of speed, either by prolonging the cooking, adding 
the silver dry, or converting its solution into an ammonio- 
nitrate. Nor does rapidity ensue by keeping the emulsion 
some days before coating. In the " Mosaics " formula it does 
to a slight extent, 

The details of washing, filtering, etc., need not be again 
gone into as they are the same as in the first formula given. 

When all this has been done you should have about sixteen 
ounces of emulsion. If not, make that amount by adding 



GELATINE. 



21 



water. To this quantity you add an ounce and a half of 
alcohol, warmed, before beginning to coat your plates. It is 
said to make the emulsion " flow more easily. 

A fault which some emulsions have, is a tendency to frill 
during development. I have not had this to contend with 
since I have used Heinrich's hard gelatine and Nelson's No. 1 
photographic (soft) gelatine. 

If your gelatine is of a frilling kind, either discard it or add 
to the emulsion, just before beginning to coat your plates, a 
solution of chrome alum, one-half grain dissolved in one 
dram of water to each ounce of emulsion. All the emulsion 
so treated must be used at once, as it will not remelt after once 
setting. 



PKEPAKINGr THE GLASS FOR COATING. 



Having brought your emulsion to the stage described above, 
it is ready to be spread upon the glass plate. We take it for 
granted you propose to coat glass and not paper. And here 
let me say a word as to the preparation of the glass itself. It 
is probable that you will make use of spoilt negatives, either 
your own or some that you obtain from friends. I get all I 
require from a professional photographer. 

To clean the old negatives, dissolve several ounces of com- 
mon washing soda in two or three gallons of hot water. In this 
solution place the negatives and leave them, for, say, twenty- 
four hours. At the end of that time you will probably find 
many of the films have disappeared, those which still adhere to 
the glass can be very easily removed by using an old tooth brush 
as a rubber. After the glasses are denuded of their old films, 
put them into hot water, to which add a small quantity of 
hydrochloric acid ; let them soak for an hour then transfer them 
to pure hot water for another hour, after which they will be 
clean and may be reared up on end to drain and dry. 

When ready to coat plates, select the number of glasses of the 
size you propose to use and polish them with a piece of soft 
chamois skin. 

In my limited experience I have not found any substratum 
required upon the glass. If I did use one, it would be a weak 
solution of water glass, which is generally recommended in 
the books. 

We will suppose you have cleaned a sufficient number of 
glasses for the emulsion you have on hand, you will then re- 



PREPARING THE GLASS FOR COATING. 



23 



quire a place in which to do the coating and the apparatus 
for it. 

In my own case, I perform the operation in the unused room 
which, as I said, communicates with my dark (bath) room. 

There is no reason why the dark room itself should not be 
made use of if it is large enough. 

You require first of all a perfectly level surface on which 
you are to place the coated plates to " set." I have a piece of 
plate glass 3 feet long and 18 inches wide, and by means of 
wedges and a spirit level, I accurately level this upon a table. 

If you cannot get a piece of glass or slate of sufficient size, 
you can obtain a piece of board, and by putting screws into it 
so as to form triangles large enough to support the plate you 
propose to coat, by driving the screws further in or withdraw- 
ing them, you can, with the board on a flat table, accurately 
level each plate. 

You also require a vessel for your emulsion, from which it 
may be poured. The books say a small china tea-pot is good. 
I have a " feeding cup " with a long spout. It holds about 4 
ounces, and answers admirably. Then a glass rod for spread- 
ing the emulsion over the plate is desirable. Finally, to dry 
your plates, you need some light-tight box or cupboard which, 
if it can be arranged to let a current of air through, will be all 
that you require. 

I have dried plates in an ordinary box to which I fitted a 
Hght-tight cover, and in which I nailed strips to keep the plates 
from slipping, leaving space on the bottom in which to put a 
saucer containing chloride of calcium, which absorbed the 
water given off by the emulsion in process of drying. Your 
own ingenuity will enable you to prepare some proper re- 
ceptacle. 



COATING. 



For coating, after trying many methods, I have settled upon 
the plan of spreading the emulsion upon each plate separately, 
by means of a glass rod, the plate having first been put upon a 
little elevated platform on the corner of my plate glass level 
surface. 

Of course you coat at night by the faintest ruby light. 
When ready for the operation I select an hour in the evening 
when the house is quiet. My glass having been made level, I 
put the ruby light in a paper box, about one foot high and 
eight inches wide, one side of which has been removed, and a 
piece of oiled yellow tissue paper pasted in its stead. 

The box containing the cleaned glass which I wish to coat is 
in front of me, to my right, the lamp is to the left. On the 
left upper corner of the plate glass, just under the lamp, I have 
a little tripod made by gluing strips of glass on another piece, 
size, 4x5 ; upon the tripod I lay the plate (we will say it is 
4|x3£). The emulsion having been melted by placing the 
bottle in water at 120 deg. F., a sufficient quantity, say 2 
ounces, is poured into the "feeding cup." This amount 
should cover twelve quarter plates ; about a teaspoonful is 
poured on to the center of the plate, the glass rod is taken be- 
tween the thumb and forefinger of each hand, brought down 
in contact with the pool of emulsion, but not so as to touch the 
glass (which immediately runs to either lateral [margin of the 
plate), and rapidly moved first forward, then backward, to the 
edge of the plate, and at each end removed by simply twirling 
it a little. It is hard to describe this movement in words. 



COSTING. 



25 



It is very simple and easily acquired. The ball of the index 
finger resting on the plate glass beneath, gives you a support, 
and it is surprising how evenly and rapidly you can slide the 
glass rod back and forth, and spread the emulsion over the plate. 
You place the coated plate on the level surface, when in a 
short time it will " set," and may be removed to your drying 
receptacle and placed in an upright position if necessary, with 
no danger of the emulsion running off. You go on until you 
have used up the amount of emulsion in your cup. As I said, 
the 2 ounces should cover a dozen 4^x3^ plates, half that num- 
ber of 4|x6^, and six or eight 5x4. It is desirable that the 
temperature of your coating room be not higher than 60 deg 



3. IN 




F. 3 though it is an advantage to have your plates warmer than 
that in order to let the emulsion " flow " more rapidly. 

It is also well to have at hand a vessel of hot water in which 
you can place your coating pot, to keep its contents warm, after 
pouring the emulsion on the plate, and while you are spreading 
it by means of the rod. In my own practice I have adopted 
the above mode of working after trying several other plans. 

For instance, you may cover a plate by "flowing" it with 
emulsion as you would varnish. An amateur friend of mine 
always adopts this method ; with me it will not work. Or 
you .may use a "coating box" of some description. 

For plates up to 4Jx6J, I prefer the rod and " feeding cup ; " 
for larger sizes I have manufactured a box of this shape. The 



26 



DRY PLATE MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 



illustration on preceding page may make it clear. As I have it, 
it is only a change in shape of one recommended some time ago 
by a writer in the Photographic Journal, of London. 

The illustration represents a sectional view of the box. The 
outlet A is made by putting a piece of card between the two 
pieces B and C while the box is being screwed together. The 
slit thus left is covered when using by a piece of thin cheese- 
cloth glued on. This filters the emulsion as it runs out and 
delivers it more regularly. The box is exactly 5 inches wide, 
is made of walnut coated inside with copal varnish. You 
pour your emulsion into it, then by tilting it by its handle the 
liquid runs over the inclined plane down to the opening and 
upon the plate. 

By having a number of plates on the levelled surface you 
can run the box along and cover them very rapidly. There is 
a tendency on the part of the emulsion not only to cover the 
top of the plate where you desire it to go, but to run over the 
edge and find its way beneath the plate, which it glues strongly 
to your level slap. To overcome this it is well to stretch across 
the leveling slab at proper intervals— say 3 inches — fine wire. 
I use a piece of rabbit wire. I secure each bit by its right 
end to a double-pointed tack driven into the table. I draw it 
tight across the surface of the slab and fasten the left end to a 
screw eye also fixed in the table. I can keep the wire taut by 
a turn of the screw eye, and as it is in close contact with the 
level slab it practically makes a platform running the length 
of the slab. If a little of the emulsion runs off your plate it 
can run under it without causing its lower surface to become 
fixed to the leveling slab. You thus avoid getting emulsion 
on both sides of your plate. I generally use up the 2 ounces 
of emulsion which 1 poured into the cup by covering plate 
after plate. By the time the last is coated the first has set, 



COA-TIIsTGr. 



27 



and may be taken from the slab and placed in whatever appar- 
atus you have prepared for use as a drying closet. 

In my box, drying is complete in about twelve hours. I 
leave the plates, though for 24 hours — the following night. 

This year I have packed many of my plates without any 
form of mat, film to film. I put them up in bundles of four, 
wrap each bundle in yellow paper, and then wrapping three 
bundles in brown manilla, put the package containing a dozen 
plates in an old box of proper size and label it thus : " Deben- 
ham's F. 1 doz. 3J-x4J. Feb. '86." 



28 



DRY PLATE MAKING FOR AMATEURS. 



CONCLUSION. 

I think if amateurs having the time and facilities will try 
their hand at emulsion making and plate coating, they will find 
it an agreeable occupation for the long winter evenings, and I 
believe it is within the power of any one who is careful to 
succeed. I have endeavored to chronicle for their benefit 
the facts of my experience, laying claims to no originality, but 
giving the methods, which, after many experiments and some 
failures and much reading, have, in my hands, proved suc- 
cessful. 




SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



1 




SCOVILL 



Portable 

Dry Plate Outfits 



FOR AMATEURS. 



THE 




Old Style Equipment. 



New Style Equipment. 



HE introduction of Dry Plates and the impetus given by them to the 



cause of Amateur Photography, created a demand for light and com- 
pact apparatus that could be easily carried about. That demand theScovill 
Manufacturing Company of New York anticipated and first met by the in- 
troduction of apparatus especially designed for the use of amateurs. 

When they announced an Outfit comprising a Camera, Holder, Tripod, 
Carrying Case, and a good Lens, for $10, a new era in Amateur Photog- 
raphy began, and it was destined to be henceforth a popular and cultivating 
recreation. 

The Cameras they make for amateurs are not mere toys — they have been 
used and approved by eminent photographers. Certainly no apparatus 
can compare with that made by our American Optical Co.'s Factory, in 
durability, accuracy and elegance of finish. It is in use in all parts of the 
globe, and has by merit won this wide-spread reputation. Be not deceived 
by what is copied after it. See that your apparatus bears the brand of their 
factory. 

Every article enumerated in this Catalogue has the guarantee of the 
Scovill Manufacturing Co., established in 1802, and well known throughout 
the world for fair and honorable dealing as well as for the marked 
superiority of their photographic apparatus and specialties. 

New Catalogues, circulars, etc., will he mailed to any 
one whose address is sent with the request for copies. 



& SCOVILL'S AMATEtR SPECIALTIES. 

CATALOGUE 

OF — 

**8COVILL'8t* 




AMATEUR 

P hotographic f foowsiTFs. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 3 



DOTILL' 

FAVORITE 



APPARATUS OUTFITS. 

All Articles of which are Warranted Accurate in Every Respect, 

These Outfits are lighter, more compact, far handsomer and more accurate 
than any which are offered at the same price. Many professional 
photographers have bought them and use them constantly. 




In each outfit the Waterbury Lens, to which stops have recently 
been added, is worth the price of the whole outfit. 



FAVOEITE OUTFIT A, urioe $10.00, comprises 




A. Favorite View Camera with vertical shifting front, single siving 
movement, rubber bellows and folding platform with patent latch for making 
bed rigid instantaneous y, to produce 4x5 inch pictures, with 

1 Patent Double Dry Plate Holder (Reversible), with, patent Registering 
Slides. 

1 Taylor Folding Tripod. 

1 No. 1 "Waterbury" Achromatic Nickel-Plated Lens with a set of Stops. 
1 Carrying Case. 



4 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



FAVOKITE OUT FIT E, price $12.00, comprises 




A Favorite View Camera with vertical shifting fronts single swing 
movement, rubber bellows and folding platform, vtxXto. patent latch for making 
bed rigid instantaneously, to produce pictures 5x8 inches ; also 

1 Patent Double Dry Plate Holder (Reversible), with patent Registering 

Slides, and with Kits. 
1 Taylor Folding Tripod. 

1 No. 2 "Waterbury" Achromatic Nickel-Plated Lens with a set of Stops. 
1 Carrying Case. 



FAVOEITE OUTFIT 0, price $18.50, comprises 




A Favorite View Camera with vertical shifting front, single swing 
movement, rubber bellows and folding platform, with patent latch for making 
bed rigid instantaneously, to produce 5x8 inch pictures. 

This Camera is constructed so as to make either a Picture on the full 
size of the plate (5x8 inches), or by substituting the extra front (supplied 
with the outfit) and using the pair of lenses of shorter focus, it is admirably 
adapted for taking stereoscopic negatives ; also, by the same arrangement, 
two small pictures, 4x5 inches each, of dissimilar objects can be made on 
the one plate. Included in this outfit are also 

1 Patent Double Dry Plate Holder (Reversible), with patent Registering 
Slides, and with Kits. 

1 Large w Waterbury " Achromatic Nickel-Plated Lens, with Stops. 

1 Pair "Waterbury" Achromatic Matched Stereoscopic Lenses, each 
with Stops. 

1 Taylor Folding Tripod. 

1 Carrying Case. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 6 



FAVORITE OUTFIT D, price $14.00, comprises 

A Favorite View Camera with vertical shifting front, single swing 
movement, rubber bellows and folding platform, with patent late h for making 
bed rigid instantaneously, to produce pictures 6|x8-£ inches ; also 

1 Patent Double Dry Plate Holder (Reversible), with patent Registering 
Slides, and with Kits. 

1 Taylor Folding Tripod. 

1 No. 2 "Waterbury" Achromatic Nickel-Plated Lens with a set of Stops. 
1 Carrying Case. 



FAVOEITE OUTFIT E, price $26.00, comprises 

A Favorite View Camera with vertical shifting front, single siving 
movement, rubber bellows and folding platform, with patent latch for making 
bed rigid instantaneously, to produce pictures 8x10 inches; also 

1 Patent Double Dry Plate Holder (Reversible), with patent Registering 
Slides, and with Kits. 

1 Taylor Folding Tripod. 

1 No. 3 "Waterbury" Achromatic Lens with a set of Stops. 
1 Carrying Case. 



EQUIPMENT A-A. 

Consists of Apparatus Outfit A, with 
1 Scovill Focusing Cloth. 
1 Dozen 4x5 Dry Plates. 
1 W. I. A. Improved Ruby Lantern. 

Complete for field service, Price, $12.25. 



EQUIPMENT B-B. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit B, with the additional articles enumerated 
in A-A. (Dry Plates 5x8 size.) 

Complete for field service, Price, $15.00. 



EQUIPMENT 0-0. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit C, with the additional^ articles mentioned 
in Equipment A-A. (Dry Plates 5x8 size.) 

^ ^ Complete for field service, Price, $21.50. 



EQUIPMENT D-D, 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit D, with the additional articles enumerated 
in A-A. (Dry Plates 6i x 8i inches.) Price, $18.00. 

Where sensitive Plates are taken to a photographer's and there devel- 
oped, printed from, and mounted on card-board, any of the above Equip- 
ments lack nothing that is essential. We recommend the amateur to finish 
his own pictures, and hence to procure one of the equipments on page 6. 



6 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



SCOVILL'S 

Pure Chemicals & Accessories 

FOR MAKING NEGATIVES. 




We offer for use with any Outfits to make pictures 4x5 inches, the fol- 
lowing goods packed securely in a wooden case : 



pkg. S.P.C. Carbonate Soda De- 
veloper, 
4x 5 Glossy Rubber Pans, 
4 oz. Graduate. 
Minum Graduate, 
oz. Bromide Ammonium, 
lb. Hyposulphite Soda, 



1 lb. Alum, 

1 bot. S.P.C. Negative Varnish, 
1 doz. 4x5 Dry Plates, 
1 Scovill Focusing Cloth, 
1 W. I. A. Ruby Lantern, 
1 Scovill Plate Lifter. 



PRICE, COMPLETE, $5.25. 



For use with any 5x8 Outfit we supply the same goods, with the 
exception of the substitution of 5 x 8 Pans and Plates for the 4x5 size. 



PRICE, 4^x5K DEVELOPING OUTFIT, $5.50. 
"5x8 " " 6.50. 

u 6^x8M " " 7.00. 

8xlO " " 8.50. 



? 



blue; prints. 

S. P. c. 

Ferro-Prussiate Paper Outfit for Printing and Mounting 4x5 Blue 

Print Pictures. 



14x5 Printing Frame. 

1 4ix5i S.P.C. Vulcanite Pan. 
3 dozen 4x5 S.P.C. Ferro-Prus- 
siate Paper. 

2 dozen sheets 6|x &| Card-board. 

Price complete, $2.80. Securely packed in a Wooden Box. 



1 Glass Form (for trimming prints). 
1 Robinson's Straight Trimmer. 
\ Pint Jar Parlor Paste. 
1 1 inch Paste Brush. 



S. P. c. 

Ferro-Prussiate Paper Outfit for Printing and Mounting 5x8 Blue 

Print Pictures. 

This Outfit is like the one above, but with Printing Frame, Vulcanite 
Tray, Ferro-Prussiate Paper and Card-board adapted to 5x8 Pictures. 

Price complete, $3.50. Securely packed in a Wooden Box. 



63^ x 8K Perro-Prussiate Paper Outfit. Price, $4.25. 




If 




s. 

Outfit for Printing, Toning, 
14x5 Printing Frame. 
15x7 Porcelain Pan Deep. 

1 x 5i S. P. C. Vulcanite Tray. 

2 dozen 4x5 S. P. C. Sensitize 

Albumen Paper. 
1 bottle French Azotate. j For 
1 " Chlor.Gold.7igr. ( toning 
1 2 ounce graduate. 



P. C. 

Fixing and Mounting 4x5 Pictures. 

1 lb. Hyposulphite of Soda. 

2 dozen sheets 6|x8^ Card-board 
with Gilt Form. 

\ Pint Jar Parlor Pastei 



1\ inch Bristle Brush. 
Glass Form (for trimming prints). 
Robinson's Straight Trimmer. 
Securely packed in a Wooden Box. 



8 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



S. P. c. 

Outfit for Printing, Toning, Fixing and Mounting 5x8 Pictures. 
This outfit is like the one on preceding page, but with Printing 
Frame, Vulcanite Tray, Sensitized Paper, and Card-board adapted for 
5x8 Pictures. 

Price complete, $6.38. Securely packed in a Paper Box.' 



4± x 5£ Printing and Toning Outfit. Price^ $5.00. 
6ix8i " " « " 7.00. 

8x10 " " " " 8.50. 



EQUIPMENT A-A-A. 

Complete in every Requisite for making the Highest Class Pictures. 

LACKING NOTHING FOR VIEW TAKING, DEVELOPMENT AND THE PRINTING 



AND MOUNTING OF PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit A $10 00 

Also 1 Chemical Outfit 4x5 (see page 6.) ... 5 25 

M 1 Sensitized Paper Outfit, 4x5 (see page 7.) 4 87 

Price, $20.00. 



EQUIPMENT B-B-B. 

Complete in every Requisite for making the Highest Class Pictures. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit B $12 00 

Also 1 Chemical Outfit 5x 8 (seepage 6.) 6 50 

« 1 Sensitized Paper Outfit (see above) 6 38 

Price, $24.50. 



EQUIPMENT C-C-C. 

Complete in every Requisite for making the Highest Class Pictures. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit C $18 50 

Also 1 Chemical Outfit 5 x8 (see page 6.) 6 50 

'« 1 Sensitized Paper Outfit (see above.) 6 38 

Price, $31.00. 



EQUIPMENT D-D-D. 

Consisting of Apparatus Outfit D - $14 00 

Also 1 Chemical Outfit (see page 6.) 7 00 

•« 1 Sensitized Paper Outfit (see above) 7 00 

Price, $28.00. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



9 




nDRY PLATE OUTFITS^ 

INTRODUCED IN 1SS4. 




These outfits are unsurpassed in neatness, lightness, and com- 
pactness, yet there is no question about their durability or 
serviceable qualities. On this account they have found favor 
everywhere. Each one is supplied with a patent reversing 
attachment, which has been styled " the lightning reverser." 



New York Outfit 601, size 4^x53^, consisting of 

1 Finely Finished Single Swing Camera, with Folding Bed and 

Improved Dry Plate Holder, with Kits. 
1 No. 1 Extension Tripod, with Patent Reversing Attachment. 
1 No. 1 Waterbury Lens, with a set of Stops, and 
1 Compact Carrying Case, with Handle. Price, $12.00. 

New York Outfit 601 A, size 43^x6^, same as described above, 
except in respect to size. Price, $13.00. 

New York Outfit 602, size 5x8, same as described above, except 
in respect to size. Price, $15.00. 

New York Outfit 603, size 63^x8^, same as described above, 
except in respect to size. Price, $18.00. 

New York Outfits not made larger than x 8^ size. 



10 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



WATERBURY OUTFITS. 




The Waterbury Cameras which we introduced in 1885, are like 
other cameras and apparatus made by the American Optical Company — 
unapproachable ! 

As we have had urgent requests for 4x5 and 62x82 sizes of Waterbury 
Outfits, we are now prepared to announce our readiness to supply such sizes 
in addition to the 5x8 stereoscopic size. For the benefit of such as have 
not seen a Waterbury Camera, we present the above illustration, and add 
that these cameras are made of mahogany. They have rubber bellows, 
folding platform, single swing, vertical shifting front, patent latch for making 
bed rigid instantaneously, and are as light and compact as substantial 
cameras can be constructed. 

Fitted with 
Eastm an- Walker 
Roll-Holder. 
New Model. 

4x5 Waterbury Outfits, Complete $12 00 27 00 

CONSISTING OF 

1 Single Swing Camera, described above. 

1 New Style Double Dry Holder, with Patent Registering Slides. 
1 Wooden Carrying Case. 
1 Taylor Tripod. 

1 No. 1 Waterbury Lens with a set of Stops. 
5x8 Waterbury Outfits, Complete $16 50 36 50 

CONSISTING OF 

1 Single Swing Camera, described above. 

1 New Style Double Dry Holder, with Patent Registering Slides. 
1 Wooden Carrying Case. 
1 Taylor Tripod. 

1 No. 2 Waterbury Lens with a set of Stops. 
6^x8^ Waterbury Outfits, Complete. .. .$20 00 44 OO 

CONSISTING OF 

1 Single Swing Camera, described above. 

1 New Style Double Dry Holder, with Patent Registering Slides. 
1 Wooden Carrying Case. 
1 Taylor Tripod. 

1 No. 2 Waterbury Lens with a set of Stops, 
r 1 • 1 ( 4^x54 Waterbury Outfit, complete. ...... ......... .$14 00 

LatBStH 4 ** 6 * " " " 1500 

UCUUfll. 5x7 ' << « " ........ .......... .. 16 00 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 11 



AMERICAN OPTIC AL CO.'S APP ARATUS OUTFITS. 

This apparatus is manufactured in New York City under our immediate 
personal supervision ; and, as we employ only highly skilled workmen, 
and use nothing but the choicest selected materials, we do not hesitate to 
assert that the products* of our factory are unequalled in durability, excel- 
lence of workmanship, and style of finish. This fact is now freely conceded 
not only in this country but throughout Great Britain, Germany, Australia, 
South America, and the West Indies. 

OUTFIT No. 202, price $22.00, Consists of 
A Mahogany Polished Camera for taking pictures 4x5 inches, with 
Folding Bellows Body, single swing, hinged bed, and brass guides. It 
has a shifting front for adjusting the sky and foreground, with 

1 Daisy Double Dry Plate Holder, with Patent Registering Slides; also 

1 Canvas Carrying Case. 

1 Scovill Adjustable Tripod. 

OUTFIT No, 202 A, price $24.00, 

The same as No. 202, but with Camera for taking pictures 4£x 5^ inches. 
OUTFIT No. 202 B, price $26.00, for pictures 4^x6i inches.' 
OUTFIT No. 203, price $30.00, Consists of 

A Folding Mahogany Camera, well 
known as the 76 Camera (see illustra- 
tion). It is adapted for taking 5x8 
inch pictures, and also for stereo- 
scopic views — together with 

1 Daisy Double Dry Plate Holder, with 

Patent Registering Slids ; also 
1 Canvas Carrying Case. 
1 Scovill Adjustable Tripod. 
OUTFIT No. 204, price $42.00, Consists of 





A Folding Mahogany Camera of finest style and finish for taking 61 x 8ft 
inch pictures, with 

1 Daisy Dry Plate Holder, with Patent Registering Slides; also 

1 Canvas Carrying Case. 

1 Scovill Extension Tripod, No. 3. 

For larger or special View Cameras, consult the American Optical 
Company's Catalogue. 

We recommend the purchase and use with the above Outfits of a 
Lens or Lenses selected from the list on page 24. 

For Chemical and Sensitized Paper Outfits to be used with the above, 
refer to pages 6 and 7. 



12 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



TOURISTS' POCKET OUTFITS. 





H 

S? 

H 

i! 


H 

En 



t> 
P 

H 

Pi 




{Extract from Photographic Times, 
^r^, 1883.) 



American Optical Company's Tourists' 
Pocket Camera. 



TOURISTS POCKET CAMERA FOLDED. 



When folded up, a 4x5 Tourists' Camera measures but 5f x 6£ x 2 
inches, and it is without any projecting parts, pins or screws, so that it may 
be slipped into and not tear a gentleman's pocket. The rods which are 
used to move forward the front of the camera are easily detached from it 
and drawn out of the bed. The connector at the other end of the rods is 
just as readily unset. To replace these three parts when the camera is 
brought out for service, requires no more time or skill than to take them on*". 
They are nicely adjusted, and are polished and nickel plated, so that they 
add to the handsome appearance of the camera, and contrast well with its 
polished mahogany surface and the purple hue of its bellows. The weight 
of this camera and its dry plate holder (but \\ pounds for the 4x5 size) is 
on the center of the tripod. In focusing, the front of the camera and the 
lens are pushed forward, thus avoiding any disarrangement of the focusing 
cloth. When the focus is obtained, further movement of the lens is checked 
or stopped by means of a screw acting on a spring, which is pressed at the 
ends against the focusing rods." 








Tourist's Pocket Outfit- No. 0206.-4x5 Tourist's Pocket Camera, with 
1 Daisy Double Dry Plate Holder, with Patent Registering Slides. 
1 Scovill Extension Tripod No. 1, with patent reversing attachment. 
1 Canvas Carrying Case with Shoulder Strap. 

Price, complete, $22.00. 

Tourist's Pocket Outfit No. 0207.-5x8 Tourist's Pocket Camera, with 
1 Daisy Double Dry Plate Holder, with Patent Registering Slides. 
1 Scovill Extension Tripod No. 2, with patent reversing attachment. 
1 Canvas Carrying Case with Shoulder Strap. 

Price, complete, $30.00. 

We recommend the purchase and use with the above Outfits of a 
Lens or Lenses selected from the list on page 24. 

For Chemical and Sensitized Paper Outfits to be used with the above, 
refer to pages 6 and 7. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



13 



SAINT LOUIS 
Reversible - Back Cameras. 

TN addition to the desirable features which the Back Focus Reversible 
Camera possesses (see description below) the St. Louis Reversible- 
Back Cameras have the rack and pinion movement, patent latch for making 
the bed rigid instantaneously, and the ground-glass so arranged that the 
holder may be slid in front of it, as shown in the illustration. 

Each Camera is supplied with one Daisy Holder with patent Registering 
Slides and canvas case. 



JFJHE growing use of dry plates, and the desire for rapid exposures, 
A led to their introduction, and because they add to the grace and 
celerity of view-taking they have become vastly popular. A novel arrange- 
ment of a detachable carriage at the back combines such a multiplicity of 
adjustments in itself that a dry-plate holder may be reversed or be set for 
either an 8x10 upright or horizontal picture — all of these movements, with- 
out once changing the dry-plate holder in the carriage, which may be made 
to take an S. G, C, but not a Bonanza Holder.. 

SAINT LOUIS REVERSIBLE-BACK CAMERAS. 

Fitted with Eastman- Walker Roller Holder. 
New Model. 

Single Double Single Double 

For View. Swing-back. Swing-back. Swing-back. Swing-back. 

4^x5^. . . .$26 00 $30 00 ...... 

5 x7 32 00 35 00 $52 00 $55 00 

6^x8^ 36 00 40 00 60 00 64 00 

8 xlO 40 00 44 00 70 00 74 00 

11 xl4 60 00 64 00 102 00 106 00 

Not made front focus above 11x14 size. 



14 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



Flammang's Patent Revolving-Back Cameras. 

Each Incased in a Canvas Bag, with Handle. 




"These are the finest View Cameras ever constructed," so says every 
photographer who has examined any of them, and this exclamation is not 
merely a tribute to the beauty and grace of their design, for invariably the 
desire has at the same time been expressed to possess one of these truly 
novel and substantial Cameras. 

Wherein lies the merit and attractiveness of the Revolving-Back Camera, 
that photographers want to cast aside cameras now in use and procure one 
of this new pattern? Briefly stated, it enables the view taker to secure 
either an upright or a horizontal picture without changing the plate holder 
after it has been slid into the carriage. No other camera can with such 
wondrous ease and celerity be changed from the vertical to the upright or 
vice versa. The carriage is simply turned about in the circle and automat- 
ically fastened. By this latter provision the carriage may be secured at 
either quarter of the circle. Ordinarily, the slide will be drawn out of the 
holder to the right ; but in certain confined situations, the ability to with- 
draw the slide to the left enables the photographer to obtain a view which 
he could not get with the usual provision in a camera. The photog- 
rapher of experience is well aware of the difficulty, when taking an upright 
picture with a large camera, of reaching up to draw out the slide at the top, 
and, what is more essential, of getting out the slide without fogging the 
plate in the holder. 

Grace and strength are combined in the Revolving-Back Camera, and 
its highly-desirable features are gained without the sacrifice of steadiness 
or any other essential principle in a good camera. Indeed, its merit is such 
that out-door photography has been advanced and made more attractive by 
its introduction, 

For a more detailed description consult Scovill's general catalogue. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 15 



Revolving-back Camera, Front Focus. 




PRICE LIST. 

Revolving-back Cameras each incased in a canvas bag, with handle, 
above 11x14 size, with two handles. 



Fitted with Eastman- 
Walker Roll Holder 
New Model. 













Single 


Double 


Single 


Double 






REVERSIBLE. 


Swing. 


Swing. 


Swing. 


Swing-back. 


550A. For View 4 


X 


5 in 


... $31 00 


$36 OO 


$46 OO 


$51 OO 


55i. 

551AB. 

55iA. 




J.V X 


$% " .... 


33 00 


38 OO 

39 00 

40 00 








°K " 


34 00 






< < 


5 


X 


7 " .... 


35 00 


55 00 


60 OO 


55iB, 


( < 


5 


X 


8 " 


. . . ■ 35 go 


40 00 


55 00 


60 00 


552. 






8^" .... 


45 00 


50 00 


69 00 


74 00 


553- 


< t 


8 


X 


10 " 


50 00 


55 00 


80 00 


85 00 


554- 


t < 


10 


X 


12 " 


65 00 


70 00 


101 00 


106 00 


555. 


< < 


11 


X 


14 " 


77 50 


82 50 


119 5o 


124 50 


556 


« 1 


14 


X 


17 " 




95 00 


140 00 


145 00 


557- 


1 1 


17 


X 


20 " 


105 00 


no 00 


170 00 


175 00 


557A. 




18 


X 


22 " 


no 00 


115 00 


185 00 


1 go 00 


558. 


1 < 


20 


X 


24 " 




130 00 


200 00 


210 00 


559- 


< 1 


25 


X 


30 " 


165 00 


175 00 







These Cameras are fitted with Daisy Dry-plate Holders. 



tag" Please state, when ordering any size below 10x12, whether front or 
back focus is desired. 

Revolving-back Cameras with front focus not made above 8x10 size. 



16 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 




THE SCOTILL MANIFOLD CAMERA. 

The Mani- 
fold Camera 
has special 
advantages 
peculiar to 
itself and 
posse sses 
the greatest 
number of 
♦esirable 
features 
which can 
be com- 
bined in 
a camera 

without sacrificing lightness and compactness, or having complicated 
adjustments. The unique device which controls the horizontal and 
vertical swings was patented by Mr. W. J. Stillman, of the editorial 
staff of the Photographic Times. To this has been added a central 
latch for the purpose of bringing the swing movements within perfect control 
of the operator. An approximate focus is obtained quickly with the rear 
portion of the camera, which is provided with the patent reversible 
back. The fine focus is 
obtained by means of the 
rack and pinion move- 
ment, shifting the front 
upon which the lens is 
attached. 

While this camera is 
made to compass the great 
length of draw shown in 
the first illustration, the 
rear portion of the bed 
may be wholly detached, 
and when desired, one- 



third of the remaining portion of the platform ; a great advantage when 
photographing interiors, when an obtrusive tail board renders focusing al- 
most an impossibility. With one-half of the bed taken off, this camera is still 
of the usual length of draw. The ground glass, when not in use, is dis- 
placed, not detached, by having the plate holder 
slid in front of it. This arrangement of ground 
glass and plate holder is shown in the second 
view. Still another noticeable feature is the 
absence of clamping screws from the front 
boards, to move which one needs but to press 
firmly against the lens. The bed folds ia front 
of and behind the camera, and has the side 
latch recently devised at the American Optical 
Co.'s factory. While this camera serves mani- 
fold purposes, as its name indicates, nothing 
could be more simple or more easily manipu- 
lated. PRICE LIST, including Canvas Case for 
Camera and one Holder, with patent Reg. Slides. 




3^x4^ size. . . $34 00 

4x5 size 38 00 

4^x5^ size. ... 40 00 



6^x8^ size. ...$52 50 
8x10 sfze 58 00 



4^x6^ size.... i $41 00 

5x7 size 42 00 

Other sizes made to order. 

Fitted with Eastman-Walking Roll Holder, New Model : 
4x5 size, $53 00 ; 4f x6i, $58 50 ; 5x7, 62 00 ; 6*x8i, $76 50 ; 8x10, $88 00 



SdOVltL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. it 




WITH WHICH TO SECURE MEMENTOES OF 
PLEASANT EXCURSIONS. 



So popular has amateur photography become among wheelmen that 
the two amusements are now often combined. The "Wheel" allows un- 
bounded opportunities to the amateur photographer to gather choice 
landscape views, which he could not get otherwise. 



" NE PLUS ULTRA" BICYCLISTS' PHOTO-OUTFIT 

(complete). 
PRICE, - - - $10.00. 

Consisting of a 3^x4^ Imitation Mahogany Camera with Vertical Shift- 
ing Front, Folding Bed, with patent latch, Double Dry Plate Holder, with 
patent Registering Slides and Hinged Ground Glass. 

A UNIVERSAL JOINT BICYCLE ATTACHMENT, 

A No. 1 WATERBURY LENS, with Stops, 

A CANVAS BAG TO CARRY THE ABOVE, with Shoulder Strap. 

The advantages of this outfit are its Lightness and Compactness, and 
the ease with which it can be brought into use — a new device on bed of the 
Camera permitting it to be made rigid, or to fold instantaneously. There 
are no loose pieces. The outfit complete weighs 2 pounds 3 ounces. 
NICKEL-PLATED BICYCLE ADJUSTABLE SUPPORT $1.50 

This has no loose pieces and is so accurately made as to have no 
side play. 

THE "MIGNON" BICYCLISTS' PHOTO-OUTEIT 

(complete). 

Consisting of a 3^x4^ Finely Polished Mahogany Camera, with 
Swing Back, Vertical Shifting Front, Hinged Ground Glass, Folding 
Bed with Patent Latch, Rack and Pinion Movement (Front Focus). In 
improvement, and has no loose pieces. Nothing finer, short, it has every 
more attractive and yet simple was ever made. 

A Universal Joint Bicycle Attachment. 

A 5% inch Morrison Wide-Angle Instantaneous Lens, 
pronounced by authorities on optics to be without a peer. The Rotary 
Shutter* with this Lens is the Most Compact and the Lightest known. 

A Canvas Saddle Bag lined with flannel to prevent marring of 
the fine finish of the camera. 



THIS OUTFIT COMPLETE WEIGHS LESS THAN TWO POUNDS. 



Price of "Mignon" Bicyclists' Photo-Outfit Complete, $70.00. 
Without Lens, $25.00. 



With the lenses just described, clear, sharp pictures can be obtained 
which will make fine transparencies and lantern slides, or which can be 
enlarged up to 8x10 size. 



18 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



SCOVILL'S OUTFIT 

For PHOTOGRAPHING with the MICROSCOPE. 



Photographing with the microscope has hitherto been accomplished by 
the aid of elaborate and costly apparatus, and been applied chiefly to 
making illustrations for scientific magazines. The process used, that of 
wet collodion in connection with sunlight, involved the procurement of an 
expensive heliostat to produce a steady illumination, for with any less 
powerful light the exposure would necessarily be so prolonged that the 
coating of the plate would dry and become useless. Now all this is 
changed, for with the modern improvements in photography which are the 
result of the introduction of gelatine dry plates, the photographing of micro- 
scopic objects becomes as easy of accomplishment as the photographing of 
the beautiful and visible in nature is with the popular amateur outfits. 

The scientist and microscopist, instead of spending hours in making 
imperfect drawings, aided by the camera lucida, may in a few minutes, with 
the assistance of photography, produce a more perfect representation of a 
minute object than it is possible for the hand of man to do, working con- 
jointly with the eye. Not only can an enlarged image of a microscopic 
object be formed for illustration, but professors in colleges will find it a 
ready means to produce negatives of a suitable size from which may be 
made transparencies or magic lantern slides for exhibition to classes or the 
public. 




If this is done in the daytime, a room from which all white light is ex- 
cluded should be selected ; but if used at night, as in most cases it would 
oe, the operations may all be performed in the midst of a family group for 
their interest and amusement, and to impart to them knowledge of the mi- 
nute life or organisms of the world which the milcroscope alone can reveal. 

Scovill's Photomicroscopic Equipment, 

— CONSISTING OF — 

1 Scovill Special Half Plate Camera. 

1 Multum in Parvo Lantern, with Double Condenser. 

1 dozen x i% size B Keystone Plates to make Negatives ; also 

1 dozen ZH x 4^ size A Plates for Transparencies. 

Price, Complete, $18.00. 
The presumption is that you are provided with a microscope. If not, 
we recommend the purchase of one from a regular dealer in microscopical 
goods. 

Circular containing directions for use sent with each outfit. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 19 



MERCER PHOTOMICROGRAPHS 



O jSu 3VL ES Ft .A. . 




This Camera is provided with a Brass Cone and Plate Holder 
with Ground Glass attached, to slide back and forth in the carriage, as 
desired. 



20 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



THE SCOVILL DETECTIVE CAMERA. 



It has not come to be generally known, but such is the fact, that Artists 
of renown and shrewd Detectives carry about these Cameras, and pictures 
are secured by them for their different lines of study through their instru- 
mentality in a manner which is perfectly simpl e — in fact, it requires no 
skill other than to get within the range of focus of the unsuspecting victim. 
As the party, whether man, woman, or child, is not aware that anything 
unusual is transpiring, the expression of the countenance and the pose are 
not arranged with reference to their appearance in a picture. A quick 
working lens is hidden in the camera, and also a few plate holders. By 
pressing on a spring the whole operation of exposure is completed. 

It followed naturally upon the introduction of the Roll Holder that it 
should be applied to the peerless SCOVILL DETECTIVE CAMERA, 
and this has been done in a manner that displays the greatest ingenuity. 
Instead of three double dry-plate holders, but one will accompany the 
Roll Holder. 

Scovill's Roll Holder Detective Camera, for 3^x4^ Pictures, with 



Scovill's Roll Holder Detective Camera, for 4x5 Pictures, with 

Morrison Instantaneous Lens 75 00 

The price for the 3^x4^ Scovill Detective Camera, with Morrison 
Lens, three double Dry-plate Holders, and room in the case 

for six double Holders 50 00 

The price for the 4x5 Scovill Detective Camera, with Morrison Lens, 
three double Dry-plate Holders, and room in the case for six 
double Holders 60 00 

Scovill's Outfit for Making Lantern Slides consists of 

1 doz. Thin Crystal Glass. 

2 " Black Mats. 

1 package Black Adhesive Paper. 

1 doz. 3|x4£ Gelatino-Albumen Dry Plates. 

1 package S. P. C. Pyro and Potash Developer. 

2 4±x5£ Solid Glass Pans. 
1 lb. Hyposulphite Soda. 

The above, packed in wooden case, price complete $3 50 

For enlarging, reducing, or copying Negatives to make Lantern Slides, 

we recommend the use of one of the Scovill Enlarging, Reducing and 

Copying Cameras. 

Many amateurs have declared that the pleasure of picture-taking was not 

fully revealed to them until they had procured and tried one of the 

SCOVILL DETECTIVE CAMERAS. 




Morrison Lens 



$65 00 



scovill's amateur specialties. 



ai 



The Scovill Enlarpff, Eeflicii aifl Copying Cameras. 




When ordering, please specify numoer and sizes of kits wanted. 



Size, 63^x8^, Price, $30.00 
" 8x10, " 35.00 

" 10x12, " 48.00 



Size, 11x14, 
" 14x17, 



Price, $60.00 
72.00 



Size, 14x17, - - $72.00. 
Special sizes and styles made to order. 

The form of construction of this new Camera is made apparent 
by the illustration here shown. The experienced copyist will not 
need any such simple directions for use as we append. 



DIRECTIONS FOR XJSK. ] 

To copy a negative in the natural size, place it in the kit on the 
front of Camera and button it in. Attached to the center frame 
of the Camera is a division upon which, on the side toward the 
Camera front, a Lens is mounted. Suppose this to be a quarter- 
plate Portrait Lens, the focal length of which we will suppose to 
be 4 inches — draw back the center frame and the Lens twice the 
focal length of the Lens (8 inches); slide the back frame with 
ground glass the same distance from the center frame. To enlarge 
with the same Lens to eight times the size of the original, the 
center of the Lens must be 4 -J inches from the negative, and the 
ground glass be 36 inches from the center of the Lens. To reduce 
in the same proportion, reverse and have 36 inches from the center 
of the Lens to the negative, and from the center of Lens to ground 
glass 4J inches. 



22 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



KILBURN GUN CAMERA, 

For 4x5 Pictures. 



Price, S27.00. 



Gunstock Attachment only $5.00. 




A popular method of hunting lately introduced is in conformity with the 
laws of Mr. Bergh's Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. It 
never results in the death or even maiming of fish, flesh, or fowl, yet all three 
may be easily bagged. The weapon used is a late invention called the gun 
camera. It consists of a small camera mounted on a gunstock and pro- 
vided with sights and triggers. Its ammunition is chemicals instead of 
powder and lead. It is both breech and muzzle loading, is light and simple 
in construction, and is used like an ordinary shot-gun. When a bird rises, 
it must be brought to the shoulder, a dead aim taken at the feathered ob- 
ject, and the trigger pulled. There is a slight shock as of an explosion, the 
bird flies on to cover unharmed, leaving its picture on the sensitive plate in 
the camera. It is all done in a moment of time. The plate is removed, 
another inserted, and the hunter is ready for the next object. The amateur 
may go forth with two dozen dry plates as his stock of ammunition. If he 
fire with precision at anv stationary or moving object, he may be absolutely 
sure of bringing it down. — New York Tribune. 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 23 



THE PETITE CAMERA. 




This camera was made to suit the refined taste of one of Vassar's fair 
students. The design on the part of the manufacturers was to reduce the 
impedimenta for^an outing to the minimum, providing a 3£x4£ camera (to 
make negatives of suitable size for lantern slides), with single swing, fold- 
ing bed with patent latch, vertical shifting front, and other desirable im- 
provements. So well has the design been carried out that many ladies will 
follow the example of Vassar's pupils, and learn the fascination of picture- 
taking with one of these finely-polished mahogany cameras. Gentlemen 
in search of a pocket camera need not seek further. The Petite Camera 
and an enlarging camera will by many be considered a satisfactory and 
complete equipment for such photographing as they desire to do. 

PRICE. 

Petite Camera with one double dry-plate holder, and patent Register- 
ing Slides $12 00 

Same Camera with Scovill's adjustable (feather weight) tripod and 

canvas bag, with shoulder strap 17 00 



WATERBURY LENSES. 

Provided with a Set of Stops. 




Notwithstanding what maybe said or imagined to the contrary, it is a 
fact that many of the most exquisite photographs ever produced have been 
taken by the single achromatic lens, which is composed of a bi-convex lens 
made of crown glass, cemented by a transparent medium to a plano-con- 
cave lens formed of flint. 

PRICE. 



No. A, Single 

" A, Matched pair 



$3 50 
7 00 



No. B, Single 
" C, " 



$4 50 
8 00 



24 SC0VILI7S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



OUTFITS FOR INSTANTANEOUS PHOTOGEAPHY. 



Instantaneous Outfit No. 401. 

CONSISTING OF 

202 Outfit $22 00 

Peerless Lens 12 50 

Instantaneous Drop (wood) for front of Lens 1 50 — $35 00 

Instantaneous Outfit No. 402. 

202 Outfit. 22 00 

No. 1 Darlot Rapid Hemispherical Lens 15 00 

Instantaneous Drop (wood) for front of Lens 1 50 — 38 00 

Instantaneous Outfit No. 403. 

202 Outfit 22 00 

Morrison's Celebrated B Group Lens, with metal Drop. . 35 00 — 56 00 

Instantaneous Outfit No. 404. 

203 Outfit 30 00 

No. 2 Darlot Rapid Hemispherical Lens 25 00 

Instantaneous Drop (wood) for front of Lens 1 50 — 56 00 

Instantaneous Outfit No. 405. 

203 Outfit 30 00 

Morrison's Celebrated C Group Lens, with Instantaneous 

metal Drop . .. 40 00 — 69 00 

The same Chemicals and Printing Requisites can be procured for the 
above as for common Outfits. 



Lenses for OMainini Instantaneous Pictures. 



B Morrison's Celebrated Group Lens, with metal Drop cac 

CC " " " " " 

No. 1 Darlot Rapid Hemispherical Lens, with wood Drop. . . . 
"2 " 

<tg it < < it <« 
Imitation Dallmeyer Lens. 



i, $35 00 
40 00 
50 00 
16 50 
26 50 
36 50 
9 50 



Lenses, matched for Stereoscope Work, per pair, 17 00 



SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 25 




Diameter 



Morrison's 
Wide-Angle View Lenses. 

Patented May 21, 1872. 

These Lenses are absolutely rectilinear; they 
embrace an angle of fully 100 degrees, and are 
the most rapid wide-angle lenses made. 



These 3 sizes will 
fit into 1 flange. 



These 5 sizes will 
fit into 1 flange. 

These 2 sizes will 
fit into 1 flange. 

These 2 sizes will 
fit into 1 flange. 

Remarks. — Nos. 1 to 6 are all made in matched pairs for 
stereoscopic work. The shorter-focused Lenses are especially 
adapted for street and other views in confined situations. For 
general purposes, a pair of No. 5 Lenses will be found most 
useful. 



No. 


of Lens. 


Size of Plate. 


00... 


.f inch. 


. . 2| x 21 inches. 


0... 


•1 " • 


..3x3 " . 


1... 


3 <« 


..4x4 " . 


2... 


i •< : 


..4x5 " . 


3... 


.i ti . 


.. 4|x % " . 


4... 


.i " . 


..5x8 " . 


5... 


.i " . 


.. 61 x 8| 44 . 


6... 


.i " . 


. . 8 xlO 44 . 


7... 


.U " • 


..11 xl4 " . 


8 


■H " 


..14 x 17 " . 


9... 


•H " • 


..17 x20 44 . 


10... 


.if " . 


..20 x 24 " . 



Equivalent 
Focus. 


Price, 




Each. 




. If inches. 


. . $25 00 




• *i " • 
.3 44 


. . . 25 00 
. . . 25 00 




• Si 44 . 
. 4i 44 . 
. 5| 44 . 


. . . 25 00 




. . . 25 00 
. . . 25 00 


- 


• 6i 44 . 
. 8 44 


. . . 25 00 




. . . 30 00 




.101 44 . 


. . . 40 00 




. 14 4 4 . 


. . . 60 00 


\ 


.17 44 


... 80 00 




.22 44 . 


...120 00 


\ 



Morrison's Instantaneous Wide- Angle Yiew Lenses. 

With full opening, these lenses have all the extreme depth for 
which the Morrison Regular Wide-Angle Lenses are noted. They 
work with extreme rapidity, and will cover an angle of 90 degrees 
sharp. Furnished with a pneumatic drop and a set of 
diaphragms. 



Diameter of Lens. 


Size of Plate, Full 
Opening. 


Size of Plate when 
Stopped Down. 


Focus. 


Price. 


With 
Rotary 
Exposer. 


$ inch. 
1 " 

H u 
if " 


4 x 4 inches. 
4x 5 " 
5x8 " 
8x10 u 


5x7 inches. 

8 x 10 " 
10 x 12 " 
14 x 17 " 


5^ in. 
8 " 
10 " 

13 u 


130 00 
35 00 
40 00 
45 00 


$60 00 
65 00 


Protectors for 


any of above 








.$12 00 



C Group Lenses 12 00 

CC " " 17 00 



26 SCOVILL'S AMATEUR SPECIALTIES. 



Darlot Hemispherical Wide-Angle Rectilinear View Lenses. 

These Lenses embrace an angle of 90 degrees, and 
are valuable for taking views of buildings, interiors, 
etc., in confined situations, where those of longer 
focus cannot be used. 

Back Focus. Size View. Price. 

No. 1, inches For Stereoscopic Work, each . . . .$12 50 

2, 3 " " " " 15 00 

3, 5 " 8 x 10 20 00 

4, 8 " 10 x 12 25 00 




Darlot Rapid Hemispherical Yiew Lenses. 

These Lenses embrace an angle of from 60 to 75 degrees; are 
quick-acting, perfectly rectilinear, and provided with central stops. 
Will be found very fine lenses for landscape and outdoor groups ; 
also for copying engravings, maps, architectural subjects, etc. 

Back Focus. Size View. Price. 

No. 1, 5^inches 5x 6 .....$15 00 

" 2, 9 " 5 x 8 25 00 

" 3, 10* " 8 x 10 35 00 

No. 1 can be had in matched pairs for Stereoscopic work. 

Scovill's "Peerless" Quick Acting Stereoscopic Lenses, 

FOR PORTRAITURE OR VIEWS. 

The Lenses are especially designed for Stereoscopic Photography, and 
are so constructed that they will work well for interiors or exteriors. 

They are particularly adapted for instantaneous work. 

Diameter of Lenses, 1% inch ; focal length, 33^ inches. 

By removing the back lens and substituting the front combination, a 
focal length of 53^ inches is obtained. 

They are supplied with six Waterhouse diaphragms in morocco case. 

Price, per pair $25 00 | Waterbury View Finder $3 00 

ALL STYLES OF LENSES SUPPLIED. 



A New Departure in Morrison Wide-Angle Lenses. 

(Extract from. Photographic Times, Vol. xiv, j>age 277.) 
Opening the velvet-lined morocco case presented to us for our inspec- 
tion, we find partitioned-off space containing an ordinary 5*-inch Morrison 
Wide-Angle Lens, on which the front and back combinations are distinctly 
marked with the figure 5. Beside this, in cells, are four mountings with 
lenses of varying focal lengths, each marked in white with a number. By- 
unscrewing the back combination marked 5, and putting in its place the 
mounting marked 6, a lens of 6-inch back focus is obtained. Again, by 
removing both these cells and replacing them with the two marked 8, a 
lens of 8-inch back focus is the result. By screwing in the front combin- 
ation marked 5 and the back combination marked 4, a lens of 4-inch back 
focus is obtained. Putting a front combination marked 8 and a back 
marked 6, a focus of 7 inches is produced. Thus the operator has a choice 
of five focal lengths with the one lens. Price for the whole, 



A complete descriptive Price List of Outfits, Accessories, Dry Plates, 
Chemicals, Transparency Frames. Dry Plate Holders, and View Albums, 
accompanies each Outfit, or is mailed free upon application. 




'76 Camera, with Morrison Lens and Water- 
bury View Finder. 



28 



SCOVILL'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Photographic Publications. 



SCOVILL'S PHOTO. SERIES. 

Price, 
Per Copy. 

HOW TO MAKE PHOTOGRAPHS, containing full instructions for making 
Paper Negatives. (One hundred and twenty thousand.) Sent free to any 
practitioner of the art. 

No. i. —THE PHOTOGRAPHIC AMATEUR. By J. Traill Taylor. A Guide 

to the Young Photographer, either Professional or Amateur. (Second Ed.) $o 50 

No. 2.— THE ART AND PRACTICE OF SILVER PRINTING. (Second Edition) 50 

No. 3.— Out of print. 

No. 4.— HOW TO MAKE PICTURES.— Third edition. TheABCof Dry-Plate 
Photography. By Henry Clay Price. Illuminated Cover, 50 cts. ; 
Cloth Cover 75 

No. 5.— PHOTOGRAPHY WITH EMULSIONS. By Capt. W. De W. Abney, 
R.E., F.R.S. A treatise on the theory and practical working of Gelatine 
and Collodion Emulsion Processes 1 00 

No. 6.— No. 17 has taken the place of this book. 

No. 7.— THE MODERN PRACTICE OF RETOUCHING — As practiced by M. 

Piquepe, and other celebrated experts. (Second Edition) 25 

No. 8.— THE SPANISH EDITION OF HOW TO MAKE PICTURES.— Ligeras 

Lecciones sobre Fotografia Dedicados a Los Aficionados 1 00 

No. 9. — TWELVE ELEMENTARY LESSONS IN PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEM- 
ISTRY.- Presented in very concise and attractive shape 25 

No. 10.— THE BRITISH JOURNAL PHOTOGRAPHIC ALMANAC FOR 1883. 25 

No. 11 —Out of print. 

No. 12.— HARDWICH'S CHEMISTRY.— A manual of photographic chemistry, 
theoretical and practical. Ninth Edition. Edited by J. Traill Taylor, 
$2. co ; Cloth 2 50 

No. 13.— TWELVE ELEMENTARY LESSONS ON SILVER PRINTING. 
No. 2 has taken the place of this book. 

No. 14.— ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY AND PHOTOGRAPHERS.— A series of in- 
teresting essays for the studio and study, to which is added European 
Rambles with a Camera. By H. Baden Pritchard, F.C.S 50 

No. 15. — THE CHEMICAL EFFECT OF THE SPECTRUM. By Dr. J. M. 

Eder 25 

No. 16.— PICTURE MAKING BY PHOTOGRAPHY. By H. P. Robinson. 

Author of Pictorial Effect in Photography. Written in popular form and 
finely illustrated. Illuminated Cover, 75 cts. ; Cloth. 1 00 

No. 17.— FIRST LESSONS IN AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. By Prof. Ran- 
dall Spaulding. A series of popular lectures, giving elementary instruc- 
tion in dry-plate photography, optics, etc 25 

No. 18.— THE STUDIO: AND WHAT TO DO IN IT. By H. P. Robinson. 

Author of Pictorial Effect in Photography, Picture Making by Photog- 
raphy, etc.; Illuminated Cover 75 

No. 19.— THE MAGIC LANTERN MANUAL. (Second edition.) By W. I. 

Chadwick. With one hundred and five practical illustrations ; cloth 75 



THE BRITISH JOURNAL ALMANAC, AND THE PHOTO. NEWS YEAR- 
BOOK OF PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1886. For the two 75 

ART RECREATION.— A guide to decorative art. Ladies' popular guide to home 

decorative work. Edited by Marion Kemble 2 00 

THE FERROTYPER'S GUIDE.— Cheap and complete. For the ferrotyper, this 

is the only standard work. Seventh thousand • 75 

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIOS OF EUROPE.— By H. Baden Pritchard, 

F.C.S. Paper, 50 cts. : Cloth 1 00 

PHOTOGRAPHIC MANIPULATION.— Second edition. Treating of the practice 

of the art and its various applications to nature. By Lake Price 1 50 

HISTORY AND HAND-BOOK OF PHOTOGRAPHY.— Translated from the 

French of Gaston Tissandier, with seventy illustrations 2 50 



SCOVILL'S PUBLICATIONS. 



29 



AMERICAN CARBON MANUAL —For those who want to try the carbon print- 
ing process, this work gives the most detailed information 2 00 

MANUAL DE FOTOGRAFIA. By Augustus Le Plongeon. (Hand-Book for 
Spanish Photographers.) Reduced to $1.00. 

SECRETS OF THE DARK CHAMBER. By D. D. T. Davie too 

HOW TO SIT FOR YOUR PICTURE. By Chip. Racy and sketchy 30 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S GUIDE. By John Towler, M.D. A text-book for 

the Operator and Amateur 1 50 

A COMPLETE TREATISE ON SOLAR CRAYON PORTRAITS AND 
TRANSPARENT LIQUID WATER COLORS. By J. A. Barhydt. Practical 
ideas and directions given. Amateurs will learn ideas of color from this book 
that will be of value to them. And any one by carefully following the directions 
on Crayon, will be able to make a good Crayon Portrait 50 



WILSON'S PHOTOGRAPHIC PUBLICATIONS. 

WILSON'S PHOTOGRAPHICS.— By Edward L. Wilson. The newest and most 
complete photographic lesson-book. Covers every department. 352 pages. 
Finely illustrated 4 00 

THE PROGRESS OF PHOTOGRAPHY SINCE THE YEAR 1879— By Dr. H. 
W. Vogel, Professor and Teacher of Photography and Spectrum Analysis at the 
Imperial Technical High School in Berlin. Translated from the German by 
Ellerslie Wallace, Jr., M. D. Revised by Edward L. Wilson, Editor of the 
Philadelphia Photographer. A review of the more important discoveries in 
Photograph}- and Photographic Chemistry within the last four years, with 
special consideration of Emulsion Photography and an additional chapter on 
Photography for Amateurs. Intended also as a supplement to the Third Edition 
of the Handbook of Photography. Embellished with a full-page electric-light 
portrait by Kurtz, and seventy-two wood cuts 3 00 

PHOTOGRAPHERS' POCKET REFERENCE BOOK. By Dr. H. W. Vogel. 
For the dark room. It meets a want filled by no other book. Full of formulas- 
short, practical and plain 1 50 

PICTORIAL EFFECT IN PHOTOGRAPHY.— By H. P. Robinson. For the art 

photographer. Cloth, $1.50; paper cover 1 00 

WILSON'S LANTERN JOURNEYS.— By Edward L. Wilson. In two volumes. 
For the Lantern Exhibitor. Gives incidents and facts in entertaining style of 
about 2,000 places and things, including 200 of the Centennial Exhibition. Per vol. 2 00 

THE PHOTOGRAPHIC COLORISTS' GUIDE.— By John L. Gihon. The 

newest and best work on painting photographs; Cloth 1 50 

PHOTOGRAPHIC MOSAICS, 1886. Published annually. Better than any of its 

predecessors. Cloth bound, $1.00; Paper cover 50 



PHOTOGRAPHIC REFERENCE BOOKS. 

AMERICAN HAND-BOOK OF THE DAGUERREOTYPE. By S. D. Hum- 
phrey. (Fifth Edition.) This book contains the various processes employed in 

taking Heliographic impressions 10 

THE NEW PRACTICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC ALMANAC FOR 1873. Edited 

by J. H. Fitzgibbon 25 

AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHIC ALMANAC FOR 1868 25 

MOSAICS FOR 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1875, 1877, 1878, 1881, 1882, 1883, 1884. Per copy. 25 

BRITISH JOURNAL ALMANAC FOR 1878, 1882 " 25 

PHOTO. NEWS YEAR-BOOK OF PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1871, 1882. * 25 

THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S FRIEND ALMANAC FOR 1873 25 

AMERICAN ALMANAC OF PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1864. Edited by Charles 

Waldack , 2 < 



ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY. 
Monthly Edition Issued the Last Friday in the Month. 



T§e photographic Tige^ 



A SPECIMEN GOPY FREE. 




SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

One Copy Weekly issue, postage included, to 

all points in U. S. or Canada $3.00 

One Copy Monthly issue, postage included, to 

all points in U. S. or Canada 2.00 

Weekly issue to foreign addresses (postage in- 
cluded) 4.00 

Monthly issue to foreign addresses (postage 

included)..'. 3.00 

Single Copy, Weekly 10 

u A - Monthly 25 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

Size of advertising pages, 6^xqi inches ; outside 

size, 8£xit|- inches. 

Cards, 2^x3 inches, per insertion. . . . $2.50 

One page, each insertion, in either Weekly or 

Monthly edition 20.00 

Outside page, special terms, in either Weekly 

or Monthly edition. 
Business Notices, not displayed, per line . .. . . 15 

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W. IRVING ADAMS, Agent. 




I